Skip to content Skip to navigation

Kate Meyer, “Uncovering the epitranscriptome: Dynamic mRNA methylation and gene expression control”

photo of Kate Meyer
February 29, 2016 - 11:00am
BECKMAN CENTER, MUNZER AUDITORIUM

Free and open to the public

Abstract:

Kate received her undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan where she majored in Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences. She then went on to earn her PhD in Neuroscience from Northwestern University where she worked in the lab of Dr. Jill Morris. Here, she studied the role of the schizophrenia susceptibility gene, DISC1, in neurodevelopment and revealed a novel role for DISC1 in regulating the migration of embryonic-born hippocampal granule cells. Following completion of her doctoral work, Kate then joined the laboratory of Dr. Samie Jaffrey at Weill Cornell Medical College for her postdoctoral studies. Here, Kate made the transformative discovery that mRNAs contain a highly prevalent base modification, m6A, which occurs when adenosine residues become methylated. Kate then went on to show that m6A residues in the 5’UTR can promote a unique mode of cap-independent translation which has important consequences for the cellular stress response. Kate’s work on m6A has unveiled a previously unknown mechanism for RNA regulation and has reshaped our views on the control of gene expression.

Bio:

Kate received her undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan where she majored in Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences. She then went on to earn her PhD in Neuroscience from Northwestern University where she worked in the lab of Dr. Jill Morris. Here, she studied the role of the schizophrenia susceptibility gene, DISC1, in neurodevelopment and revealed a novel role for DISC1 in regulating the migration of embryonic-born hippocampal granule cells. Following completion of her doctoral work, Kate then joined the laboratory of Dr. Samie Jaffrey at Weill Cornell Medical College for her postdoctoral studies. Here, Kate made the transformative discovery that mRNAs contain a highly prevalent base modification, m6A, which occurs when adenosine residues become methylated. Kate then went on to show that m6A residues in the 5’UTR can promote a unique mode of cap-independent translation which has important consequences for the cellular stress response. Kate’s work on m6A has unveiled a previously unknown mechanism for RNA regulation and has reshaped our views on the control of gene expression.
Event Sponsor: 
ChEM-H in partnership with the Department of Biology and the Department of Chemical and Systems Biology
Contact Email: 
Kathy Morway <morway44@stanford.edu>