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Gretchen Daily

The ecological (and evolutionary) dynamics of biodiversity change in natural and human-modified ecosystems. The quantification and mapping of ecosystem services, in biophysical, economic, and cultural terms. Feasible pathways for and novel approaches to ecological restoration, from biophysical, economic, and cultural perspectives. Field research based mostly in the Neotropics and Hawai'i; ecosystem services projects in a range of sites internationally

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Rodolfo Dirzo

My current work on conservation biology emphasizes the need of complementing the traditional interests of the conservation of taxa with the increasingly needed conservation of ecological processes. Most of my tropical work is carried out in Mexico and Central Amazonia.

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Paul Ehrlich

Conservation biology; ecology, evolution, and behavior of natural populations (especially of butterflies); human ecology and evolution.

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Marcus Feldman

Evolution of complex genetic systems that can undergo both natural selection and recombination. Human demographic studies, particularly of the sex ratio. Human molecular evolution.The evolution of learning as one interface between modern methods in artificial intelligence and models of biological processes, including communication. The interaction of biological and cultural evolution, for example in the spread of food plant domestication across Europe, and the transmission of learned behaviors in contemporary groups.

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Chris Field

Ecosystem responses to interacting global changes, controls on the carbon and energy balance of natural ecosystems, and ecology and biogeochemistry at the global scale.

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Hunter Fraser

We study the regulation and evolution of gene expression using a combination of experimental and computational approaches. Our work brings together quantitative genetics, genomics, epigenetics, and evolutionary biology to achieve a deeper understanding of how genetic variation within and between species affects genome-wide gene expression and ultimately shapes the phenotypic diversity of life.

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Tadashi Fukami

Ecological and evolutionary community assembly, with emphasis on historical contingency in community structure, ecosystem functioning, biological invasion and ecological restoration, using experimental, theoretical and comparative methods involving bacteria, protists, fungi, plants and animals.

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Deborah Gordon

Our research examines the social behavior and ecology of social insects. The current research investigates (1) Ant colony organization. (2)Ecology of harvester ant populations.(3)Population genetics of harvester ant populations.(4)The invasive Argentine ant.

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Elizabeth Hadly

We study morphologic, genetic, population and community responses to the last several thousand years of climatic change in vertebrate ecosystems of temperate North and South America

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Richard Klein

Richard G. Klein researches the archeological and fossil evidence for the evolution of human behavior. He has done fieldwork in Spain and especially in South Africa, where has excavated ancient sites and analyzed the excavated materials since 1969. He has focused on the behavioral changes that allowed anatomically modern Africans to spread to Eurasia about 50,000 years ago, where they swamped or replaced the Neanderthals and other non-modern Eurasians.

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Kabir Peay

Ecology, community structure & ecosystem function of plant-microbial symbiosis

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Dmitri Petrov

We are interested in a wide range of questions in molecular evolution and molecular population genetics. We do theoretical, computational and experimental work to address these questions. Our primary focus at the moment is on (i) population genetics and molecular mechanisms of adaptation and (ii) genome evolution.

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Jonathan Pritchard

We are interested in a broad range of problems at the interface of genomics and evolutionary biology.   One current focus of the lab is in understanding how genetic variation impacts gene regulation and complex traits. We also have long-term interests in using genetic data to learn about population structure, history and adaptation, especially in humans.

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Noah Rosenberg

Research in the lab addresses problems in evolutionary biology and human genetics through a combination of mathematical modeling, computer simulations, development of statistical methods, and inference from population-genetic data.  Our current work covers topics such as human genetic variation, inference of human evolutionary history, the role of population genetics in the search for disease-susceptibility genes, the relationship of gene trees and species trees, and mathematical properties of statistics used for analyzing genetic variability.

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Shripad Tuljapurkar

Dynamics and evolution of human and natural populations. Sensitivity and extinction dynamics in the presence of disturbance, population aging and age structural transitions, evolution of senescence.

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Peter Vitousek

Nutrient cycling in tropical and temperate forests. Regulation of cycling of nitrogen, phosphorus, and several other nutrients by using chemical analysis of soil, water, and gas samples from field sites. Biological invasion by exotic species, and sources of elements during long-term soil and ecosystem development in the Hawaiian Islands.

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Emeriti

Carol Boggs

We are exploring how environmental variation affects life history traits, population structure and dynamics, and species interactions in ecological and evolutionary time, using Lepidoptera. Current interests include (1) how resource allocation strategies interact with foraging and life history in variable environments to affect fitness and population dynamics; (2) the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of small populations, including population re-introductions; and (3) invasion biology, particularly the evolutionary and ecological effects of non-native species' invasion into co-evolved systems.

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Harold Mooney

Harold Mooney has demonstrated that convergent evolution takes place in the properties of different ecosystems that are subject to comparable climates, and has pioneered in the study of the allocation of resources in plants. Research in his laboratory is currently centered on the study of the impact of enhanced CO2 on ecosystem structure and function.

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Ward Watt

Developing evolutionary theory from mechanistic viewpoints. Using techniques ranging from biochemistry, DNA sequencing, and wind-tunnel flight biophysics to field ecology and mathematical population genetics, we study biochemical and physiological mechanisms of genetic variation, ecological niche structure as the source of natural-selective pressures, and the resulting patterns of evolution of metabolic organization.

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